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Thursday, July 22, 2010

SHA1 Algorithm

SHA-1 is a cryptographic hash function designed by the National Security Agency (NSA) and published by the NIST as a U.S. Federal Information Processing Standard. SHA stands for Secure Hash Algorithm. The three SHA algorithms are structured differently and are distinguished asSHA-0SHA-1, and SHA-2. SHA-1 is very similar to SHA-0, but corrects an error in the original SHA hash specification that led to significant weaknesses. The SHA-0 algorithm was not adopted by many applications. SHA-2 on the other hand significantly differs from the SHA-1 hash function.
SHA-1 is the most widely used of the existing SHA hash functions, and is employed in several widely-used security applications and protocols. In 2005, security flaws were identified in SHA-1, namely that a mathematical weakness might exist, indicating that a stronger hash function would be desirable.[2]Although no successful attacks have yet been reported on the SHA-2 variants, they are algorithmically similar to SHA-1 and so efforts are underway to develop improved alternatives.[3][4] A new hash standard, SHA-3, is currently under development — an ongoing NIST hash function competition is scheduled to end with the selection of a winning function in 2012.

SHA-1 produces a 160-bit digest from a message with a maximum length of (264 − 1) bits. SHA-1 is based on principles similar to those used by Ronald L. Rivest of MIT in the design of the MD4 and MD5 message digest algorithms, but has a more conservative design.
The original specification of the algorithm was published in 1993 as the Secure Hash StandardFIPS PUB 180, by US government standards agency NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology). This version is now often referred to as SHA-0. It was withdrawn by NSA shortly after publication and was superseded by the revised version, published in 1995 in FIPS PUB 180-1 and commonly referred to as SHA-1. SHA-1 differs from SHA-0 only by a single bitwise rotation in the message schedule of its compression function; this was done, according to NSA, to correct a flaw in the original algorithm which reduced its cryptographic security. However, NSA did not provide any further explanation or identify the flaw that was corrected. Weaknesses have subsequently been reported in both SHA-0 and SHA-1. SHA-1 appears to provide greater resistance to attacks, supporting the NSA’s assertion that the change increased the security.

Comparison of SHA functions

In the table below, internal state means the “internal hash sum” after each compression of a data block.
Algorithm and
Output size (bits)Internal state size (bits)Block size (bits)Max message size (bits)Word size (bits)RoundsOperationsCollisions found
SHA-0160160512264 − 13280+,and,or,xor,rotYes
SHA-1None (263 attack)[5]
SHA-2SHA-256/224256/224256512264 − 13264+,and,or,xor,shr,rotNone
SHA-512/384512/38451210242128 − 16480+,and,or,xor,shr,rotNone


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